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Showing posts from December, 2011

International Conference on Astrophysics & Cosmology (ICAC), March 19-21, 2012!

Astrophysics and Cosmology Research Group Nepal (ACRG-Nepal) has announced an international conference on Astrophysics and Cosmology in Kathmandu, Nepal during 19-21 march 2012. The registration details are available now available at http://astronepal.webs.com/icac2012.htm

According to the organizer, the purpose of this conference is to bring together experienced as well as young scientists who are interested in working actively on various aspects of astrophysics & cosmology, to exchange their research findings and to expose young minds in the field of astrophysics & cosmology from Nepal. The lectures will address major theoretical issues and current observational successes in the field. The lectures will be arranged in such a way that the young researchers will have ample scope of interaction with the speakers who are both nationally and internationally leading experts in their respective field of research. Besides the special invited talks, there will be contributing presenta…

Join NASO the TLE celebration in Nepal at NAST on December 10, 2011!

As the second and last of two total lunar eclipses in 2011, the total lunar eclipse occurring on 10 December is posed to enthrall eclipse-enthusiasts from central and eastern Asia, Australia, New Zealand, Alaska and northern Canada. The first total lunar eclipse was observed on 15 June this year. The eclipse’s total phase would last for meager fifty one minutes. Its faint penumbral shadow would begin to cover moon at 17:16 hours local time. The dark umbral phase would touch the moon at 18:30 hours. The moon would enter into totality at 19:51 hours and would arrive at the maximum phase of the greatest eclipse at 20:17 hours. The umbral eclipse magnitude would reach 1.11 at this stage. The totality end at 20:43 hours and the umbral shade would recede from the moon fully at 22:03 hours. The entire eclipse would be finally over at 23:16 hours.

On this occasion, Nepal Astronomical Society (NASO) in collaboration with Nepal Academy of Science and Technology (NAST) would like to organize foll…

Join NASO the TLE celebration in Nepal at NAST on December 10, 2011!

As the second and last of two total lunar eclipses in 2011, the total lunar eclipse occurring on 10 December is posed to enthrall eclipse-enthusiasts from central and eastern Asia, Australia, New Zealand, Alaska and northern Canada. The first total lunar eclipse was observed on 15 June this year. The eclipse’s total phase would last for meager fifty one minutes. Its faint penumbral shadow would begin to cover moon at 17:16 hours local time. The dark umbral phase would touch the moon at 18:30 hours. The moon would enter into totality at 19:51 hours and would arrive at the maximum phase of the greatest eclipse at 20:17 hours. The umbral eclipse magnitude would reach 1.11 at this stage. The totality end at 20:43 hours and the umbral shade would recede from the moon fully at 22:03 hours. The entire eclipse would be finally over at 23:16 hours.

On this occasion, Nepal Astronomical Society (NASO) in collaboration with Nepal Academy of Science and Technology (NAST) would like to organize foll…

Don't miss the upcoming Total Lunar Eclipse on December 10, 2011

As the second and last of two total lunar eclipses in 2011, the total lunar eclipse occurring on 10 December is posed to enthrall eclipse-enthusiasts from central and eastern Asia, Australia, New Zealand, Alaska and northern Canada. The first total lunar eclipse was observed on 15 June this year. The eclipse’s total phase would last for meager fifty one minutes. Its faint penumbral shadow would begin to cover moon at 17:16 hours local time. The dark umbral phase would touch the moon at 18:30 hours. The moon would enter into totality at 19:51 hours and would arrive at the maximum phase of the greatest eclipse at 20:17 hours. The umbral eclipse magnitude would reach 1.11 at this stage. The totality end at 20:43 hours and the umbral shade would recede from the moon fully at 22:03 hours. The entire eclipse would be finally over at 23:16 hours.

How can you do Lunar eclipse observation?

They are safe to watch with naked eyes. Unlike solar eclipse, which can only be gazed briefly from any spec…